Of Course He isn’t Safe, But He’s Good

My friend, Rich Hansen, who pastors a church in Chicago, has just published a book called Paradox Lost.  In one of the chapters, he talks about C.S. Lewis’ classic book The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.  In the book, two sisters, Lucy and Susan, are talking to Mr. and Mrs. Beaver about Aslan the lion, who is Lewis’ figure for Jesus.  Susan says, “I’d thought he was a man.  Is he – quite safe?”  I shall feel rather nervous about meeting a lion.”  Mrs. Beaver says, “If there’s anyone who can appear before Aslan without their knees knocking, they’re either braver than most or else just silly.”  So, Lucy asks, “Then he isn’t safe?”  Mr. Beaver says, “Safe?  Don’t you hear what Mrs. Beaver tells you?  Who said anything about safe?  ‘Course he isn’t safe.  But, he’s good.”

Rich describes this as a tuning fork paradox:  God isn’t safe, but God is good.  As with all biblical paradoxes, living within this tension is difficult and yet essential.  According to A.W. Tozer, the God we envision determines the person we are becoming.  What happens to people who are primarily focused on a God who “isn’t safe” or what the Bible speaks of as justice, judgment, or wrath?  We already know.  Those with the primary image of a wrathful God eventually become wrathful themselves.  Those who believe only in a judging God easily become judgmental.  They become unable to offer any mercy and, just as tragically, unable to receive mercy themselves.  This is not a pretty picture of God, and folks who see God only in these ways are not endearing to be around.  Since these judgmental caricatures are usually how Christians are portrayed in our media, who can blame churches for treating this unsafe God the way families deal with odd Uncle Harry:  keep him in the background so he doesn’t embarrass us in front of the guests.

But Rich asks:  what about the other side of Mr. Beaver’s statement:  “He’s good”?  Even beyond good, doesn’t the Bible say, “God is love?”  Unfortunately, we can subtly turn that biblical statement on its head until it becomes “Love is God.”  We then fall prey to the opposite caricature:  God the benignly loving heavenly grandfather, who smiles on his children no matter what they do.  If this is our mental image of God, we easily assume that any loving person is automatically a godly person or that any belief system with some love in it must also have God in it.  Experience shows that neither is true.  God is not only loving; God is also just.  In fact, if God were not perfect justice, neither could God be perfect love.

Rich reminds us of something else that A.W. Tozer wrote:  “The vague and tenuous hope that God is too kind to punish the ungodly has become a deadly opiate for the consciences of millions.”  An opiate is a drug that dulls our senses and makes us lose touch with reality.  It’s a fatal notion that a loving God could never judge anyone.  Why do we assume that love and justice do not coexist in God?  C. S. Lewis says with wonderful understatement, “Some people talk as if meeting the gaze of absolute goodness would be fun.  They need to think again.”  God is so good, and God’s love is so pure, that nothing impure can stand before him.  It’s the justice of God that shows us what terrible trouble we’re in.  And it’s the love of God, through Jesus’ death on the cross, that allows our burden of sin to be released.

Our view of God determines the kind of people we are becoming and the kind of lives we are leading.  The Bible teaches us that God is not shallow – God is deep.  God is so deep that sometimes He is difficult for us to understand.  The nature of God sometimes brings together seemingly opposite ideas in a way that is hard for us to imagine.  This is called a paradox.

So, while we can come to know God as children, it will take more than a lifetime to really understand God, Who He is, Why He acts the way He does, and why He calls us to be the kind of people we are becoming.  God combines revelation and mystery, certainty and wonder, questions and answers.  The challenge for us is not to reduce God down to something smaller than He is.  We need to allow God to remain big, bigger than our problems, and bigger than our world.  Only then can we catch a glimpse of how amazing God is, and how wonderful the Kingdom of God is going to be in the future.  Of course God isn’t safe, but He’s good.

 

 

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